Auto Body Collision Columbus Market

Many people choose to sell a car for cash throughout Lincoln Village, Amlin, and Clinton each year. Those with non-running vehicles in Groveport, Dublin, and Washington, should sell your scrap car to us. Those with broken down cars in Pickerington, Valleyview, Upper Arlington, can call us for the value of a junk car. We buy any car, running or not, in Brice, Flint, and Westerville; therefore, contact us for a quote today.

In the January 2, 2017 edition of Auto News, Richard Truett posted a story about the demand for auto body workers in Columbus, OH:  “On Monster, the giant national career website, more than 1,000 auto dealers, independent body shops, hot-rod shops and other businesses are running help wanted ads for body-shop technicians. There’s a nationwide shortage of skilled body repair technicians, painters and auto body prep experts that rivals the shortage of service department repair technicians. To help offset the ongoing shortage of body-shop techs, the Collision Repair Education Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Hoffman Estates, Ill., is kicking off its second year of nationwide career fairs aimed at attracting high school and college students.

The fairs, staffed by new-car dealers, body-shop supply companies, independent body shops and suppliers, are scheduled for 14 major cities starting early next month. More fairs are scheduled for the fall. In 2016, each event attracted roughly 200 students, said Brandon Eckenrode, the foundation’s development director. At the one-day fairs, held at schools, training facilities, hotels and other locations, students have the opportunity to meet with potential employers, including body-shop managers, who explain the career path from school to work.

Many students, Eckenrode said, are surprised to learn how much they can make if they become experts at painting cars. “I give students a pep talk when I meet them before they enter the fair and tell them there are people who paint cars that easily make over six figures. But that’s not where you are going to start,” Eckenrode said. Like technician trainees who start out doing menial work such as oil changes and tire rotations, collision-repair students also begin their careers performing jobs that don’t require specialized training, such as prep work that requires removing trim and broken components and cleaning the outside of the vehicle to get it ready for body repairs. In these jobs, they learn how to use tools and how to follow proper procedures.

Although attendance at the fairs has been strong — one held in November in Columbus, Ohio, drew nearly 400 students — the foundation also works with schools in markets it doesn’t serve. “We reach out to schools and ask that they refer any student looking for full-time work. We gather their information and have them create a student resume, which we use to build a database. Then we distribute that to employers,” Eckenrode said.  The foundation doesn’t yet have firm data on the number of students who have found collision-repair jobs through the fairs, but Eckenrode says they are working.  “Part of the fun of my job is that I have met students at 10 a.m. who are unemployed and they walk out at 2 p.m. with several job offers because of the need that is out there.” The full story is available here.

To Sell a Car for Cash in Franklin County

Those who reside in areas including Marble Cliff, Harrisburg, and Riverlea can sell a car for cash. When you sell your scrap car to us, we handle environmental disposal throughout Urbancrest, Minerva Park, and Georgesville. Residents in the regions of Brown, Norwich, and Perry, may be able to obtain sufficient value of a junk car based on the model. The good news for those residents of Plain, Sharon, and Darbydale, is that we buy any car in the regions. Did you know that in the US, over 11 million vehicles are scrapped each and every year, providing tremendous amounts of salvageable components and recyclable material.

Vehicle Loan Forecast

Are you wondering where to sell junk cars in Ohio towns such as Valleyview, Whitehall, and Montgomery? We are the people that buy junk cars in the regions of Brice, Flint, and Westerville 6 days a week. To determine the value of your old car simply contact us for a quote for an old car in the areas of Huber Ridge, Truro, and Madison. When you contemplate your options sometimes the best solution is to scrap a car for cash and move onward. Are you in the process of determining whether to sell your scrap car in the Gahanna, Franklin, or Grandview Heights areas?

Apparently the US government is playing “watchdog” on the auto lending industry lately. In the July 11, 2016 edition of the WSJ, Andrew Ackerman posted a story titled ‘U.S. Regulator Flags Auto-Lending Risks’ with the following details: “A U.S. banking representative warned about growing credit risk in the automobile-lending sector, raising the possibility of fresh regulatory pressure in the area. The Office of the Comptroller, which oversees large national banks which includes many of the biggest banking firms in the U.S., highlighted the risks in its bi-annual report.

The OCC said auto-lending risk is heightening “because of notable & unprecedented growth across all types of lenders. As banks have fought for market share, some banks have gone with less stringent underwriting standards, the report said. The report indicated the role of indirect auto lending, in which banks offer cash to auto dealerships, who in turn lend to consumers. The report said indirect lending reflects “an area of significant fair lending risk” amid fast growth. Comptroller of the Currency, Mr. Thomas Curry had raised the red flag once before about auto lending, making an analogy between it and the mortgage crisis.

Automotive lending has spiked in recent years with historically lower interest rates, inexpensive gas and stronger consumer demand. Auto loans even performed pretty well during the financial crisis, which market observers have viewed as a sign that the loans are safe because even low income households must pay for transportation. Auto lenders also have an easier time obtaining collateral on a past due auto loan—by repossessing the vehicle—than they do foreclosing on a house covered by a failing mortgage.” The complete article is available at this link.

Where to junk cars in Ohio

Among the people that buy junk cars, we extend you fast and courteous scrap car removal in Grove City, Jefferson, and Hilliard. The quote for an old car is a cash price that we will pay you when we tow away the vehicle in Obetz, Jackson, or New Albany. How do I scrap a car for cash in Galloway, Hamilton, or Pickerington? Simply locate the title and give our scrap car buyer a call for a price on the unwanted vehicle; regardless of if located in Reynoldsburg, Mifflin, or Washington. To efficiently sell your scrap car in Upper Arlington, Lake Darby, or Worthington with same-day pick up, contact us at (614) 715-5005.

Junk Car Cleanup

Sell your scrap car to us and you will be able to tell that the choice you made was great. In the scrap vehicle hauling business, we buy junk cars and offer efficient service. We are among the sites where to scrap a car quickly for cash in this area. Do you have a car that is junk? Make your neighbors happy by scrapping it with a provider who buys old cars. Our wrecked car buyer will pay you cash for a car in any condition. To sell your scrap car, call our wrecked car buyer who buys old cars 6 days a week. There is no need to decide where to scrap a car, since we buy junk cars—you have already found us!

In the April 6, 2016 edition of the Swift County Monitor-News, Reed Anfinson authored a story titled ‘Council aims to focus on cleaning up Benson’ with the following information: “You see a car parked in a front yard with tarp over it and a block later three cars are parked in a front yard. Down a couple more blocks is a house that has been badly in need of a paint job for years. Drive around some more in the community and you see a surprising number of residential neighborhoods with cars parked in yards. We don’t remember it being quite as prevalent as it is today. Maybe people used to take more pride in what their yards looked like in the past. Maybe they knew their neighbors better and were more respectful of not being the one responsible for making a neat and well-cared-for block look junky. But cars aren’t the only problem. People are pulling large campers into residential yards and leaving them. You will see pickup campers, some with old tarps over them, some not, dropped in a yard. Some yards have dilapidated sheds with holes in them and broken doors providing great habitat for feral cats and rodents. Others yards are strewn with a wide assortment of junk.

The problem of broken down, dilapidated buildings isn’t a one isolated to residential areas. There are a few in the downtown area as well. Buildings needing paint, a building with the metal roof caving in, and others just simply in need of some attention to take them from looking run down to passable are a few of the problems that need correcting. According to Doug Griffiths and Kelly Clemmer, if you want to ensure that your community fails, then you have to make sure you don’t paint. Of course, painting isn’t the only factor included in this concept – it encompasses anything that may beautify your community such as sweeping, cleaning, planting flowers, mowing grass, picking up garbage. We are struggling as a region to attract people to come and live here. But while we will go to extraordinary lengths to get a new business land, buildings and financing to help them get started or expand, we need to do a much better job of making this a community that looks like a really nice place to live. Communities are often judged by first impressions. As people drive around your town, they make judgments not just about what it has to offer, but also about how it looks. It doesn’t take many rundown homes, yards full of junk, or cars parked in yards for the people driving around to say, I wouldn’t want to live next door to that!

At that point, you have likely blown your opportunity to maybe bring a young family of four to town. The employer who was hoping to fill a vacancy with a well-qualified person has lost him or her to another community. They won’t be buying a home; they won’t be going to the local grocery story; they won’t be buying goods at the local hardware store; they won’t be visiting the local medical clinic; or helping the local school district out with the $7K in state funding each of their children represents –funding that helps maintain classroom teachers. Benson’s City Council is talking about getting serious in its enforcement of nuisance laws to see the community cleaned up. In the coming weeks it’s likely that those who have let their yards become an eyesore are going to be getting ticketed.

If our current ordinances don’t address the problem of cars parked in yards, then we hope they pass one. This law can also address campers. Not everyone is going to be happy with the council’s efforts. Some are going to be angry about it; some think that local government has no business telling them to clean up their yard or where to park their vehicles. But Benson’s council does have an interest in ensuring property owners meet a minimum standard for cleanliness & appearance. Health issues, protecting the value of properties in a neighborhood, as well as helping spur economic development are all good reasons to enforce these standards. We certainly support and appreciate the direction the council is taking on making the community a more attractive place to live.” The complete article is available here.

Who buys old cars in Columbus?

Call our wrecked car buyer for a junk car quote from our team who buys old cars. Are you seeking where to scrap a car in Franklin County? To sell your scrap car, pick up the phone for same-day or next-day scrap vehicle removal services. Perhaps you weren’t aware that as an eco-conscious recycler, our program reduces unwanted water and land pollution, as well as a plethora of other environmental benefits. As a organization with best practices in place, we divert tons of materials annually from going to landfills.